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About Amit Varma

Amit Varma is a writer based in Mumbai. He worked in journalism for over a decade, and won the Bastiat Prize for Journalism in 2007. His bestselling novel, My Friend Sancho, was published in 2009. He is best known for his blog, India Uncut. His current project is a non-fiction book about the lack of personal and economic freedoms in post-Independence India.

My Friend Sancho

My first book, My Friend Sancho, was published in May 2009, and went on to become the biggest selling debut novel released that year in India. It is a contemporary love story set in Mumbai, and had earlier been longlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize 2008. To learn more about the book, click here.

If you're interested, do join the Facebook group for My Friend Sancho

Click here for more about my publisher, Hachette India.

My posts on India Uncut about My Friend Sancho can be found here.

Bastiat Prize 2007 Winner

Recent entries

The Real Issue Regarding The National Anthem

There’s an interesting video that seems to have gone viral on social media showing a bunch of hooligans in a…

Carlsen 1, Fischer 0

In an excellent feature on Magnus Carlsen in the Telegraph, Nigel Farndale writes: He [Carlsen] has always been interested in…

On Winning the Bastiat Prize for Journalism

I was fortunate a few days ago to win the Bastiat Prize for Journalism for the second time. The prize…

The Asuras Have Taken Over

As today is apparently Constitution Day, here’s a thought from the great BR Ambedkar, who is considered the chief architect…

All Your Base

Munna Kumar Sharma, the national secretary of the Hindu Mahasabha, has said about Aamir Khan: If not move to Pakistan,…

12 September, 2008

Mahabharata Through The Eyes Of Bhima (And Savita Bhabhi)

My friend Prem Panicker has just begun a recreation of MT Vasudevan Nair’s Randaamoozham: The Mahabharata told from the point of view of Bhima. He’s uploading it on his blog, and it promises to be a hell of a series.

In this post, he explains why he’s attempting this.

And here are the first two installments in the series: 1, 2.


Maybe someday I’ll attempt writing the Mahabharata from the point of view of Savita Bhabhi. Yes, I know she’s not in the original story, but she can always be inserted, no? For example:

The Kauravas are about to disrobe Draupadi when she says, “Wait, would you like to disrobe my friend instead?” Savita Bhabhi steps forward.

Duryodhana takes one look at her, turns to Shakuni, and they wink at each other. Draupadi steps aside. Duryodhana grabs Savita Bhabhi’s saree. And pulls.

It comes off with one tug.

“That was just a two-yard saree,” explains Savita Bhabhi. “Nine yards is too much work.”

Savita Bhabhi is now wearing the same choli she wore when she was seven years old along with a thong bikini that, as thong bikinis haven’t yet been invented, is quite a sight for the Kauravas.

Just then a voice pipes up from the throne:

“I can see! I can see! I can see!”

Posted by Amit Varma in Arts and entertainment

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